Candy Kennedy – Trials and Errors

Pupdate

 

Bilrust

I’ve invariably think when I first start pups “wow” is it always this much work? Then one day things begin to click and the fun begins. The second stage seems to be what I remember about starting them – always forgetting the original parts that aren’t as enjoyable. This time around I have a friend that has pups the same age and it’s gratifying to email the “ups and downs” and to hear you aren’t the only one with “issues”.  No matter how many dogs you train you reflect on how the training is going (well, if you are a good trainer you should!)

I had sent her a video of the bro/sis combo and made the comment that Cove has more pace than Core. She was surprised and said the video looked as if Core had a lot of pace. He does! His pace is different from her pace. Core sets his pace. Cove allows the sheep to set hers. That email got me thinking why certain dogs fit us (as handlers) and other don’t.

I like a dog that allows me to control the speed of the sheep. So, I like push with feel. I don’t want so much push that they run through the middle of their sheep. However! I prefer that (which I can control with a slow down or stop) to one that has to be “begged” to speed up. I try to teach dogs that are slow … how to and why they need to speed up. I slow fast dogs down and let them see they can still control sheep at that speed. That’s all part of training – but the “fundamentals” of what is “intrinsic” to each dog is there and will always be there.

I find that part fascinating. I’ve seen wide running dogs get wider and wider as they get tired.  Logic would dictate when tired enough they would “tighten” down. Doesn’t happen. Their basic programming kicks in … all that training disappears. That’s why I say when you breed – the training doesn’t go with the dog. Only the natural.  Pick wisely!

Anyway, on to the pups! This time around … I’ll focus on Core for now as he has hit that fun stage. I told my friend it has gone from “sheep-sheep-sheep” to “sheep-sheep-Candy”. I’m in the picture because he wants me there instead of physically putting myself in the picture. For me that’s what all the “beginning steps” were for – teaching him that 1/2 the enjoyment of working sheep is interacting with me. Once they grasp that concept we can start actual training. Without that realization and acknowledgement … training would be nothing but teaching him physical moves.

He has push … I love push! However, I need him to understand that push is a “piece of the puzzle” but not the entire “puzzle”. I will keep the push in but refine it down so he learns when to use it and when to “back off”. Perfection is NOT the goal at this stage. He needs to experience that what he does influences the sheep and to understand the reason I communicate with him – is to help him mange HIS sheep better. Not just to tell him what to do. Listening is advantageous to him! Trust is the first building block that will make him amenable to listening to me when we start to include distance into his work.

He is a team player and interested in what I’m asking of him. That makes him a pleasure to work. He is very good on his right (Away side) and a bit tight and not quite covering on his left. So, I use his right to work on little outruns since the “odds are in my favor” they will be better. This allows him to be correct (without me interfering). When he grasps the idea of what a “mini” outrun is. I will go to the left so when I correct him he will understand because we have set the “stage” of an outrun. I spend time and energy encouraging a dog to think and figure out what I’m trying to communicate to him.

On flanks, I have a “get out of that” when he tries to be tight and fall in behind his sheep before he’s covered (on his left flank).  I won’t back up or allow him to have his sheep if he is tight and short. He’s really just a “hair” short (usually because he hasn’t given the correct distance) but if I allow it to continue – it will become a habit. Bad habits are much harder to “amend” than going slowly and putting the effort in to make it accurate from the start. It’s all a matter of letting him know when he’s wrong (short, tight, etc.) and letting him work when he’s right.

He’s going to be a fun one !!!

10 responses

  1. Bryan

    hey Candy , good stuff for me to here as I am starting a pup this winter .

    November 26, 2014 at 9:24 am

  2. Oh forgot … Core was born in January and is a Kevin Evans Jimmy son.

    November 26, 2014 at 10:40 am

  3. Bryan

    No more snow that was kinda of a freak snow they say !

    November 26, 2014 at 11:13 am

  4. Well, it was very pretty! So is your place.

    November 26, 2014 at 11:25 am

  5. Bryan

    You And Jan will have to come visit and work dogs sometime .

    November 26, 2014 at 12:24 pm

  6. Thanks! Would love to. Happy Thanksgiving to you guys!

    November 26, 2014 at 12:28 pm

  7. Mary Minor

    Thank you for this article Candy. Always a good read!

    Mary M

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

    November 28, 2014 at 7:17 am

  8. Pingback: Building blocks | Training Border Collies

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